2020 Naperville Census

What? Why? How?


What is the Census?

As mandated by the U.S. Constitution in Article 1, Section 2: the U.S. census has counted residents every 10 years since 1790. The data collected by the census determines the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and is also used to distribute billions in federal funds to local communities.

People doing various things

The 2020 Census at a Glance

The 2020 Census at a Glancepdf icon

[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

Questions on the Census

The 2020 Census will ask:

  • How many people are living or staying at your home on April 1, 2020.
  • Whether the home is owned or rented.
  • About the sex of each person in your home.
  • About the age of each person in your home.
  • About the race of each person in your home.
  • About whether a person in your home is of Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin.
  • About the relationship of each person in your home.

If a baby is born before or on April 1, 2020, they should be counted in the 2020 Census. Babies born after or on April 2, 2020 should not be counted.

Not sure who to count? The 2020 Census website has more details.

The 2020 Census will never ask for:

  • Social Security Numbers
  • Money or donations
  • Bank or credit card account numbers.
  • Anything on behalf of a political party

The census will not include questions about citizenship. It is important to complete the census regardless of immigration status. The U.S. Census Bureau will never share information with immigration enforcement agencies or law enforcement agencies.

If someone claiming to be from the Census Bureau contacts you via phone or email and asks for one of the above, it is a scam. Do not provide additional information.

Why Does the Census Matter?

Census data is used to distribute approximately $675 billion in federal funding to communities each year.
Other ways census data is used includes:

  • Redistricting of state legislative districts.
  • Forecasting future transportation needs for all segments of the population.
  • Determining areas eligible for housing assistance and rehabilitation loans.
  • Assisting federal, tribal, state, and local governments in planning and implementing programs, services, and emergency response.
  • Designing facilities for people with disabilities, the elderly, and children.
  • Determining where businesses should expand, open new stores or provide services or products.

What populations are at risk of being left out of the census?

People who are immigrants, not proficient in English, experiencing homelessness, young children (under five) and young mobile people (ex. college students) are at greater risk of being missed.


For more information on the how the census impacts our community, the 2020 Census Complete Count Committee Guide lists fifty ways census data is used.

How Can I Help?

The Census Bureau is recruiting thousands of people across the country. Census takers work in their local communities and must be available when people are usually at home, such as evenings and weekends.
Applicants must:

  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Have a valid Social Security number.
  • Pass a Census Bureau-performed background check and a review of criminal records, including fingerprinting.
  • Have a valid driver's license or access to public transportation.
  • Have access to a computer with internet and an email account (to complete training).
Interested individuals should visit the 2020census.gov/jobs and complete an online application. People doing various things

How are Responses Collected?

Most households will receive an invitation by mail and given the option of responding online, by mail or by phone. The online form will be optimized to allow people to respond on a smartphone, tablet or computer. The online questionnaire will be available in 13 languages:

  • Arabic
  • Chinese [Simplified]
  • English
  • French
  • Haitian Creole
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog
  • Vietnamese

 

The Census Bureau will have a toll-free phone number in 13 languages for people who have questions or need help responding to the census. You can also complete the questionnaire over the phone when you call.

Households that fail to respond will get reminders and eventually receive a paper questionnaire. Census workers will follow up in person should a household not respond via the paper questionnaire.

How long does it take to complete?

It should take approximately 10 minutes to complete the census questionnaire.

The 2020 Census is accessible for everyone.

The 2020 Census is accessible for everyonepdf icon

[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

Confidentiality

Confidentiality Logo

Your responses are protected by law. The U.S. Census Bureau cannot release any information that identifies you individually for 72 years. The Census Bureau uses your information for statistical purposes only, such as helping to inform decisions for new hospitals, schools and roads. The Census Bureau will never share information with immigration enforcement agencies or law enforcement agencies.
The information collection process is designed with layers of security to keep your information safe and secure. No matter your method of response, your information is collected, transmitted and kept secure throughout the process. The Census Bureau works with the federal intelligence cyber community and industry experts to continuously update protections and safeguards.

The Census Bureau never asks for:

  • Social Security Numbers
  • Money or donations
  • Bank or credit card account numbers.
  • Anything on behalf of a political party
If someone claiming to be from the Census Bureau contacts you via phone or email and asks for one of the above, it is a scam. Do not provide additional information.

Upcoming Events

  • Census Day 2020
    04/01/2020 - 11:45pm

    When completing the census, you will include everyone living in your home on April 1, 2020.

  • Developing a Sixth Census
    04/18/2020 - 9:30am
    Nichols Library -- Community Room

    This program will show how to squeeze as much as possible from Federal population schedules including critical years with important data. Get to know some census “miracles” and stumbling blocks. Presenter Dr. Daniel Hubbard is a former particle physicist, now a full-time professional genealogist and writer.

Information at the Library

Naperville Public Library provides access to online resources featuring historical census information as well demographic information for businesses.
A valid Naperville Public Library card is required for remote access.

  • Heritage Quest: A genealogy warehouse with U.S. Census data from 1790-1940, family and local histories, Revolutionary War Era Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application files, and Freedman's Bank records. Learn some fascinating facts about the past censuses from The Census Book by William Dollarhide.
  • Gale Business DemographicsNow: The demographics tool leverages Census data, consumer expenditures, retail spending to help users "crunch" data in easy-to-use report formats providing complete demographic information for any geographic territory.